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The De La Salle Academy

The De La Salle Academy

The De La Salle Academy

Inspiring People;
Breaking Boundaries

Houses

Each house at the Academy is named after a historical figure and students are assigned a house when they join the Academy. Houses are used for activities and rewards when students take part in events which we run throughout the year.

Saint Edmund Arrowsmith

Arrowsmith

Saint Edmund Arrowsmith (1585 – 28 August 1628) is one of the Forty Martyrs of England and Wales of the Roman Catholic Church. The main source of information on St Edmund is a contemporary account written by an eyewitness and published a short time after his death. This document, conforming to the ancient style of the "Acts of martyrs" includes the story of the execution of another 17th-century Recusant martyr, Richard Herst.

   

Thomas Becket

Becket

Thomas Becket (c. 1118 (or 1120) – 29 December 1170) was Archbishop of Canterbury from 1162 until his murder in 1170. He is venerated as a saint and martyr by both the Catholic Church and the Anglican Communion. He engaged in conflict with Henry II of England over the rights and privileges of the Church and was murdered by followers of the king in Canterbury Cathedral. Soon after his death, he was canonised by Pope Alexander III.

   

Saint John Fisher

Fisher

Saint John Fisher (c. 19 October 1469 – 22 June 1535) was an English Catholic. He was a man of learning, associated with the intellectuals and political leaders of his day, and eventually became Chancellor of the University of Cambridge. Fisher was executed by order of Henry VIII during the English Reformation for refusing to accept the king as Supreme Head of the Church of England and for upholding the Catholic Church's doctrine of papal primacy.

   

Sir Thomas More

More

Sir Thomas More (7 February 1478 – 6 July 1535), was an English lawyer, statesman and noted Renaissance humanist. He was an important councillor to Henry VIII and Lord Chancellor from October 1529 to 16 May 1532. More later opposed the King's separation from the Catholic Church and refused to accept him as Supreme Head of the Church of England. Tried for treason, More was convicted on perjured testimony and beheaded.